It’s summertime so that means it’s time for lemonade and iced tea and other iced beverages. To make things more festive on the weekends, after a long day of working in the garden, I love to serve iced tea with ice that has been frozen with a sprig of mint. Adding herbs and flowers to ice has been around for centuries as a way to flavor less-than-flavorful drinks.

This is why Sarah Munro, (my PhD historian and heroine in book 2 of the Deadly Force series, ONE DARK WISH), has added her recipe for Herbal Ice to her collection of DIY herbal recipes. My favorite combinations are mint ice with iced tea, lemon balm ice with lemonade, and chamomile ice with decaf herbal iced tea. I also love to use lemon thyme, rosemary & sage, rose hips, and violets. You can be as creative as you want, and the combinations are endless!

Sarah Munro’s Herbal Ice

Ingredients:

  • Filtered water
  • Fresh herbs or flowers of your choice, picked over and rinsed
  • silicone ice tray

Directions:

Rinse and pick over the herbs and flowers to make sure there are no bugs or extra leaves or pollen on the plants.

Cut the herbs and flowers into small pieces and place them in the ice cube tray squares. Fill the ice cube squares with filtered water to the top of the tray. As you pour in the water, press down the herbs and flowers.

Freeze for at least 4 hours. Use however you wish!


IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER ABOUT WILD PLANTS, FORAGING, AND MAKING HERBAL REMEDIES:

I am not a medical professional and nothing written on this blog is medical advice. None of my statements have been evaluated by the FDA (I am legally required to give you this disclaimer).

It is important to do your due diligence before foraging, harvesting, and/or consuming any type of medicinal plant.

  • If you are taking any medications, talk to your doctor about any potential drug interactions.
  • If you are allergic to anything, make sure whatever you are foraging is not in the same family. Example: While dandelions are typically considered safe, those who are allergic to ragweed, latex, daisies, or any other plants in the same or similar families, may not be able to consume dandelion.

Always research potential side effectsdosage recommendations, and how to properly prepare and consume each medicinal plant.

Always make sure you are foraging what you believe to be. Fully prepare and study the anatomy before harvesting wild plants.

Always make sure your kitchen/work area is clean and that all materials are sterilized.

Do not forage plants from areas that have been sprayed within the past 2 years at the very least.

I am not legally or morally responsible for the health of any of my readers. Please do your own research!


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